Caregiver Support

Having the support of a loved one or a caregiver is important for good health and healing once a patient is discharged from the hospital.

While being a caregiver is a highly rewarding and meaningful experience, we also know there will be times when you may feel lost and overwhelmed as you try to balance your own personal needs and providing care for your loved one. The Gritman family is here to support you before, during and after your stay with caregiver information and education you can trust.

This page is designed to be a resource to help you and your loved one transition home and begin to settle in.

Older-couple-sitting-on-a-bench
Caregiving: How to prepare
Caregiving: How to Prepare
Many people care for a spouse, a parent, or some other family member who is disabled or ill. Caregiving can be a rewarding experience. But caregiving can also be stressful.
Caregiving: Take Care of Yourself Too
Caregiving: Take Care of Yourself Too
When you're caring for a loved one, it can be rewarding, but stressful. It's really important to make time for yourself, so you don't get overwhelmed.
Helping someone move:BED
Caregiving: How to Turn a Person in Bed
You can help your loved one avoid pressure injuries by helping him or her turn and change position in bed. A drawsheet can help.
Helping someone move: CAR
Helping Someone Get In and Out of a Car
When you're helping someone get in and get out of a car, know that you're helping them stay safe from a fall or an injury.
What is a Patient Advocate
What Is a Hospital Patient Advocate?
Questions about a health problem ... treatments, tests, equipment, medicines, bills, who does what ... the list goes on.
Home Health Care
Home Health Care: What to Expect
Home health care is medical care that you need to recover but may not be able to do yourself.
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Health and E ducation

Many people care for a spouse, a parent, or some other family member who is disabled or ill. Caregiving can be a rewarding experience. But caregiving can also be stressful.

Take care of yourself: Exercise regularly, get proper rest and nutrition, and have regular medical checkups. And take time off to take part in pleasant, nurturing activities.

Don’t help too much: Help the person you care for to be as independent as possible. For example, let the person make as many decisions as possible.

Ask for help: Accept support from others. A helping hand at the right time can make all the difference. For example, ask family or friends to pick up a few items at the grocery store.

Cleaning and Reducing Germs
Reducing germs and infections in the house
Washing soiled clothes and linens
Using disposable gloves
Cleaning up diarrhea 

Helping at Mealtime


Crystal Schluter, Care Management director; Holly Hall, nursing leader; and Nichole Wheaton, Emergency Department director.

Here for patients and caregivers

Gritman is there for you before, during and after your stay (Pictured above, from left to right: Crystal Schluter, Care Management director; Holly Hall, nursing leader; and Nichole Wheaton, Emergency Department director.) Having the support of a loved one or a caregiver is important for good health and healing once a patient is discharged from the hospital. While being a ...

Caregiver Resources

Family Caregiver Alliance National Center on Caregiving
AARP: A Resource Guide for Idaho Family Caregivers 
Idaho Commission on Aging